Updated policies - Find out all the information about our updated policies at the bottom of the page.

Pet Procedures

Pre-op advice for you and your pets

Pre-operative advice for owners prior to a procedure

  • Cat Spay
  • Cat Castration
  • Bitch Spay
  • Laparoscopic Bitch Spay
  • Dog Castrate
  • Rabbit Spay
  • Rabbit Castration
  • Dental
  • Cruciate Surgery
  • Patella Surgery
  • TPLO
  • Arthroscopy
  • Fracture Repair

Cat Spay

How to prepare for your pet’s Cat Spay surgery

What is a Cat Spay?

The procedure your cat will be having today is called an ovariohysterectomy or commonly called a cat spay. This surgical procedure involves removing the ovaries and the uterus or womb. Once this procedure has been performed it cannot be reversed.

Benefits to your cat include:

  • Eliminates behaviors associated with, and permanently stops further seasons
  • Prevents unwanted pregnancies and reduces the urge to roam
  • May reduce aggressive instincts and therefore fighting
  • Eliminates the risk of pyometra (womb infection)

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns. This list is not exhaustive. We will discharge your cat with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times which can help reduce the incidence of post-operative complications.

Should an accepted complication arise, owners are liable for the costs associated with the complication:

  • Anaesthetic death
  • Haemorrhage (bleeding) both during and after the procedure (inside or outside the abdomen)
  • Wound break down or complete wound infection
  • Bruising and swelling seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Damage to internal organs
  • Pain
  • Suture material reaction
  • Herniation
  • Peritonitis
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub
  • Risk of injury on recovery post-operatively

The procedure sometimes is performed on the flank and in some breeds the fur can regrow a different colour. If this is a concern please discuss with a member of staff prior to the procedure.

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your Cat.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (Unfortunately, we are not able to accept RAW diets in the building).
  • Your pet will be discharged with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times.                          
  • Your pet will need to be on restricted exercise.
  • Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet.  

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.

Cat Castration

How to prepare for your cat’s Castration surgery

What is a cat Castration?

The procedure your cat will be having today is called a castration. This surgical procedure involves removing both testicles but leaving the scrotum in place. Once this procedure has been performed it cannot be reversed.

Benefits to your cat include:

  • May reduces the urge to spray, and if they do the scent should be less pungent
  • Prevent unwanted pregnancies and may reduce the urge to roam
  • May reduce aggressive instincts and therefore fighting

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns. This list is not exhaustive. We will discharge your cat with a buster collar to be worn at all times which can help reduce the incidence of post-operative complications. Should an accepted complication arise, owners are liable for the costs associated with the complication.

  • Anaesthetic death
  • Haemorrhage (bleeding) both during and after the procedure
  • Wound infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Damage to the penis
  • Pain
  • Risk of injury on recovery post-operatively
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your Cat.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready.  (If they have any specific allergy requirements, Please bring a meal of their food from home in for them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.                 
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (Unfortunately, we are not able to accept RAW diets in the building).
  • Your pet will need to be on restricted to indoor exercise only.
  • Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet.  

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.

Bitch Spay

How to prepare for your pets Bitch Spay surgery

What is a Bitch spay?

The procedure your dog will be having today is called an ovariohysterectomy or commonly called a bitch spay. This surgical procedure involves removing the ovaries and the uterus or womb. Once this procedure has been performed it cannot be reversed.

Benefits to your dog include:

  • No unwanted pregnancies
  • No further bleeding from seasons
  • Eliminates the risk of pyometra (womb infection)
  • Can reduce the risk of mammary cancer.

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns. This list is not exhaustive. We will discharge your dog with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times which can help reduce the incidence of post-operative complications. Should an accepted complication arise, owners are liable for the costs associated with the complication:

  • Anaesthetic death
  • Haemorrhage (bleeding) both during and after the procedure (inside or outside of the abdomen)
  • Wound break down partial or complete
  • Wound infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Damage to other internal organs
  • Pain
  • Suture site reaction
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub
  • Peritonitis
  • Herniation
  • Risk of injury on recovery post-operatively

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your dog.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (Unfortunately, we are not able to accept RAW diets in the building).
  • Your pet will be discharged with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times.
  • Your pet will need to be on restricted exercise and lead walking only for toileting for at 5-7days following their surgery.
  • Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time

Laparoscopic Bitch Spay

How to prepare for your pets Laparoscopic Bitch Spay surgery

What is a Laparoscopic Bitch Spay?

Laparoscopic spaying is a type of keyhole surgery which removes only the ovaries and not the uterus. Usually in a conventional bitch spay both the ovaries and uterus are removed. Laparoscopic ovary removal uses three tiny incisions into the abdominal cavity to allow for the insertion of a camera and specialist instruments to perform surgery with the greatest precision and minimal invasion. The equipment that we use is brand new and state of the art; the same as that used in modern human operating theatre.

Laparoscopic ovary removal has many benefits in comparison with a standard bitch spay, which include:

  • A quicker recovery (allowing for exercise to be resumed promptly)
  • Smaller wounds  with a reduced level of discomfort
  • Reduces the risk of infection post-surgery
  • The cameras allow for organs to be examined more closely

Benefits to your dog include:

  • No unwanted pregnancies
  • No further bleeding from seasons
  • Eliminates the risk of pyometra (womb infection)
  • Can reduce the risk of mammary cancer.

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns. This list is not exhaustive. We will discharge your dog with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times which can help reduce the incidence of post-operative complications. Should an accepted complication arise, owners are liable for the costs associated with the complication:

  • Anaesthetic death
  • Haemorrhage (bleeding) both during and after the procedure (inside or outside of the abdomen)
  • Wound break down partial or complete
  • Wound infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Damage to other internal organs
  • Pain
  • Suture site reaction
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub
  • Herniation

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your dog.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (Unfortunately we are not able to accept RAW diets in the building).
  • Your pet will be discharged with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times.
  • Your pet will need to be on restricted exercise and lead walking only for toileting for at 5-7days following their surgery.
  • Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.  

Dog Castrate

Preparing for your dog’s castration

What is a dog castration?

Castrating involves removing both testicles. It the eradication of testerone production. Therefore removing the ability to reproduce.

Benefits to your dog include:

  • The inability to reproduce.
  • Can help prevent future prostate problems.
  • Can help with naughty tendancies such as humping, and boisterous behaviour. However to note this is not a guarantee as some behaviours are already learnt at this stage.
  • Prevention of testicular cancer.

Should I castrate my dog?

Is your dog nervous with people or other dogs?

Castrating dogs eliminates the production of testosterone. Too much testosterone can show behaviours like overconfidence with other dogs. If your dog is also showing signs of sexual nature. ie, humping toys, legs other dogs. If you are unsure if you want to castrate your dog give us a call and we can guide you from there.

Chemical castration

This is sometimes an option, which would need to be discussed with your veterinary surgeon prior to your appointment. This is a non – invasive way of temporarily ‘castrating’ your dog without doing so. This can show you what your dog would be like if he was castrated. This is a good option for anyone who is unsure if a castration will help their dog’s behaviour.

If you would like to know more than please give us a call.

*If you do have an entire female it is worth noting that male dogs can have still reproduce for up to four weeks after!*

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (Unfortunately we are not able to accept RAW diets in the building).

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

There could be a few clip patches on your pet’s legs, this is where we will place an intravenous catheter to administer anaesthetic and painrelief drugs.

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns. This list is not exhaustive. We will discharge your dog with a medical pet t-shirt or buster collar to be worn at all times which can help reduce the incidence of post-operative complications. Should an accepted complication arise, owners are liable for the costs associated with the complication.

  • Anaesthetic death
  • Haemorrhage (bleeding) both during and after the procedure
  • Wound break down partial or complete
  • Wound infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Pain
  • Suture site reaction
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub
  • Risk of injury on recovery post-operatively
  • Damage to the penis

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your dog.

­­­­­­­­­­­­If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.  

Rabbit Spay

How to prepare for your Rabbit’s Spay surgery

Every surgical procedure that is undertaken carries accepted associated risks and complications. Although rare, we want you to be fully informed before you proceed.

The procedure your rabbit will be having today is called an ovariohysterectomy or more commonly a spay. This surgical procedure involves removing the ovaries and the uterus. Once this procedure has been performed it cannot be reversed.

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns.

  • Haemorrhage (bleeding)
  • Wound break down or infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Damage to internal organs
  • Pain
  • Suture material reaction
  • Herniation
  • Peritonitis
  • Anaesthetic death (higher risk in rabbits)
  • Risk of injury when handling and on recovery post-operatively. Rabbits are at higher risk of injury to their backs which can lead to permanent paralysis
  • Gut stasis
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub
  • Laceration to the skin from clippers (rabbits have very thin skin)

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your pet.

Benefits to your Rabbit include:

  • No unwanted pregnancies
  • Eliminates the risk of pyometra (womb infection)
  • Can reduce the risk of mammary cancer.

We will discharge your rabbit with a medical pet t-shirt to be worn at all times which can help reduce the incidence of post-operative complications.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (please bring in some of your rabbit’s own hay and feed with them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet SHOULD NOT BE STARVED prior to surgery.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food in its carrier so they have continuous access to eat.
  • Please ensure there is no straw or sawdust in your pet’s carrier as this can irritate the wound post operatively. Please use hay only.
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Your pet will be discharged with a medical pet t-shirt to be worn at all times.
  • Your pet will need to be on restricted exercise and cage rested for 6 days following their surgery.
  • Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.  

Rabbit Castration

How to prepare for your Rabbit’s castration surgery

Every surgical procedure that is undertaken carries accepted associated risks and complications. Although rare, we want you to be fully informed before you proceed.

The procedure your rabbit will be having today is called a castration. This surgical procedure involves removing both testicles but leaving the scrotum in place. Once this procedure has been performed it cannot be reversed.

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns.

  • Anaesthetic death (higher risk in rabbits)
  • Haemorrhage (bleeding)
  • Wound break down
  • Wound infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Damage to the penis
  • Pain
  • Risk of injury when handling and on recovery post-operatively. Rabbits are at higher risk of injuring their backs which can lead to permanent paralysis.
  • Herniation
  • Gut stasis
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub

We take precautions to minimise these risks to your pet.

Benefits to your Rabbit include:

  • No unwanted pregnancies
  • Eliminate risk of testicular tumours
  • While castration doesn’t always calm Rabbits down, it can reduce testosterone driven activities such as mounting behaviour or aggression.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (please bring in their own food with them).

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet SHOULD NOT BE STARVED prior to surgery.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food in its carrier so they have continuous access to eat.
  • Please ensure there is no straw or sawdust in your pet’s carrier as this can irritate the wound post operatively. Please use hay only.
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Your pet may be discharged with a medical pet t-shirt to be worn at all times.
  • Your pet will need to be on restricted exercise and cage rested for 3 days following their surgery.
  • Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.  

Dental

Preparing for your pet’s dental procedure and what to expect

What Dental Procedure is my pet having?

Scale and Polish

If they are just having a scale a polish, this will involve an intense clean of the teeth using an electric scaler, which shoots out water and helps break down and off tartar that has built up over time.  This will intensely clean the teeth. There are many benefits to scale and polish as it can help prevent future dental disease/ prevent teeth from getting worse.

Extractions

If your pet has been booked in for extractions (removing the teeth), then a scale and polish will be done first to give a clearer view to the state of the teeth themselves!

Extractions are done if the tooth is too diseased, broken or causing problems.

They may also have to have dental x-rays. This can reveal the state of the tooth below the gumline and can help determine if teeth need to come out or not. 

All dentals require a general anaesthetic. Meaning they will be asleep for procedure.  They will be monitored by a Veterinary nurse. There are risks to general anaesthetics which will be outlined to you in your pet’s consultation. 

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Things to consider and be aware of before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (Unfortunately, we are not able to accept RAW diets in the building).

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them).

Please read the following list of complications that can result from this procedure and ask a member of staff if you have any questions or concerns. This list is not exhaustive Should an accepted complication arise, owners are liable for the costs associated with the complication.

  • Anaesthetic death
  • Infection
  • Bruising and swelling
  • Seroma (pocket of fluid)
  • Pain
  • Risk of injury on recovery post-operatively
  • Clipper rash or skin reaction to surgical scrub

If you can give us a ring between 2pm and 3pm the afternoon of the surgery, we can inform you how your pet has been throughout the day and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate that evening.

Payment for the operation and care your pet received will be required upon collection of your pet

What to look and prepare for whilst recovering

  • Feed your pet soft food that is easy to eat – this will help whilst their mouth is recovering.
  • If your pet has extractions then you might see stitches in the gumline. These don’t need to come out, and will dissolve in time.
  • You might see some blood in water and food the next day or so. This is normal providing there is no profuse bleeding – if you are concerned then you need to call.
  • If your pet has had extractions then we tend to see them in 3 and 10 days. This is to check that everything is healing well.
  • Your pet will be provided with some painrelief to go home with. If you think they are still not comfortable and feeling painful then give us a call.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us prior to the appointment time.

Cruciate Surgery

How to prepare for your pets cruciate surgery (Lateral Suture)

What is a lateral suture?

A lateral suture is a procedure where an artificial ligament is attached on to the stifle to replace the torn cruciate ligament. 

How is a lateral suture surgery is performed?

Following your pets examination with your surgeon, your pet’s surgery will be scheduled when appropriate for your pet’s individual requirements. Surgery may be performed on the same or a different day from the investigations. 

When your pet is admitted for their procedure, they will receive a premedication to relieve any anxiety and pain. If your pet is over 7 years of age a pre-anaesthesia blood sample may also be run to ensure there is no underlying concerns that may affect our anaesthesia (This will be included in your estimated cost). Following this premedication, an intravenous catheter will be placed so that anaesthesia induction period is smooth and un-stressful. Once anaesthesia is induced your pet will have a series of specific radiographs taken. 

An epidural is then performed so your pet doesn’t experience any discomfort during or initially following the surgical procedure, this will be the small clipped patch on your pet’s lower back. 

Your pet’s leg will be clipped from the level of the hip to just below the ankle for the surgery and prepped aseptically prior to entering theatre. Whilst in theatre your pet will receive monitoring by a fully qualified Veterinary Nurse using a full multiparameter monitoring machine, ensuring all your pet’s vitals are monitored closely throughout the duration of the surgery. 

A sterile dressing will then be placed over the incision. Before waking up from the anaesthesia your pet will also receive a k-laser session to try and reduce any swelling and/or bruising that may occur. 

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them). 
You are welcome to call our Kennel Nurse in the evening (prior to 6pm) to receive an update on how your pet is doing following their surgery and any progress they are making in their recovery.  The following morning the Veterinary Surgeon will do a full examination on your pet to assess how they have coped with the anaesthesia and evaluate how the operated leg is following the surgery.
If you can give us a ring around 9.30am the morning following your pets surgery we can then inform you how they’ve been overnight and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate. 

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (we are not able to accept Raw diets)
  • Please ensure that we have all of your insurance policy information in order to process a claim when your pet’s treatment is finished.
  • Your pet may need to be confined to a small room or cage following their surgery until you are informed otherwise by your vet. 

Patella Surgery

Preparing for your pet's patella surgery

What is patella luxation?

Patella luxation is when the patella is able to move inappropriately inside the knee joint. The movement of the quadriceps then leads to the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia) forming an outward bow. The groove that the patella would usually sit in does not form properly hence allowing it to move around the joint typically medially.

How is the surgery performed?

There are a variety of surgeries that can be used to correct a patella luxation and your surgeon will choose the most appropriate for your pet. 

Tibial Tuberosity Transposition

The main aim of the surgery is to realign the patella tendon. This surgery cuts the bone is which the patella tendon attaches to and moves it to a more suitable position. The bone is then secured in its new placement with the use of wires and pins. This means that the pull of the quadriceps muscle is balanced by the wire securing the tibia in the opposite direction.

Femoral Varus Osteotomy 

This surgery is usually performed in dogs with severe bowing of the femur (thigh bone), so this surgery is aimed at straightening the femur. To achieve this the surgeon will remove a wedge of bone and fix the femur using a plate and screws. Femoral varus osteotomy is most commonly performed on larger dogs and dogs with higher grades of patellar luxation. 

Sulcoplasty 

This surgery is used to deepen the groove that the patella would usually sit in preventing the ability for it to move inappropriately. The surgery incorporates the removal of a wedge of cartilage and bone, which is replaced in a lower position.

Once a surgery has been decided on an epidural is then performed so your pet doesn’t experience any discomfort during or initially following the surgical procedure, this will be the small clipped patch on your pet’s lower back. 

Your pet’s leg will be clipped from the level of the hip to just below the ankle for the surgery and prepped aseptically prior to entering theatre. Whilst in theatre your pet will receive monitoring by a fully qualified Veterinary Nurse using a full multiparameter monitoring machine, ensuring all your pet’s vitals are monitored closely throughout the duration of the surgery.          X-rays are obtained at the end of the operation to assess the implants placed during the surgery. A sterile dressing will then be placed over the incision. Before waking up from the anaesthesia your pet will also receive a k-laser session to try and reduce any swelling and/or bruising that may occur.

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them, we are however unable to accept Raw diets for our patients). 

You are welcome to call our Kennel Nurse in the evening (prior to 6pm) to receive an update on how your pet is doing following their surgery and any progress they are making in their recovery.  The following morning the Veterinary Surgeon will do a full examination on your pet to assess how they have coped with the anaesthesia and evaluate how the operated leg is following the surgery.

If you can give us a ring around 9.30am the morning following your pets discharge we can then inform you how they’ve been overnight and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate. 

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet (we are not able to accept Raw diets)
  • Please ensure that we have all of your insurance policy information in order to process a claim when your pet’s treatment is finished.
  • Your pet will need to be restricted to a small room or a cage post operatively until you are informed otherwise by your vet. 

TPLO

Preparing for your pet’s cruciate surgery - TPLO

What is a TPLO?

TPLO is the abbreviation for tibial plateau levelling osteotomy. This a surgical procedure used to correct cranial or anterior cruciate ligament rupture in the stifle. It involves changing the angle of the top of the tibial plateau which is the top of the tibia (shin bone) by cutting the bone, rotating it, and fixing it in place with a plate and screws thus enabling the joint to be stable. 
How the day will run

Following an examination with the surgeon, your pet’s surgery will be scheduled when appropriate for your pet’s individual requirements. Surgery may be performed on the same or a different day from the investigations.  
 
When your pet is admitted for their procedure, they will receive a premedication to relieve any anxiety and pain. If your pet is over seven years of age a pre-anaesthesia blood sample may also be run to ensure there is no underlying concerns that may affect our anaesthesia.  Following this premedication, an intravenous catheter will be placed to allow easy access for anaesthetic drugs and fluids.  Once anaesthesia is induced your pet will have a series of specific radiographs taken to allow the surgeon to measure the angle of the tibial plateau enabling us to plan for surgery. It may be necessary to take a sample of fluid (synovial fluid) from the knee if this is noticed on radiographs and send it to our external laboratory for analysis. 
An epidural is performed so your pet doesn’t experience any discomfort during or initially following the surgical procedure.  There will be a small clipped patch on your pet’s lower back from this.
Your pet’s leg will be clipped from the level of the hip to just below the ankle for the surgery and cleaned aseptically prior to entering theatre. Whilst in theatre your pet will receive monitoring by a fully qualified Veterinary Nurse using a full multi-parameter monitoring machine, ensuring all your pet’s vitals are monitored closely throughout the duration of the surgery. 

X-rays are obtained at the end of the operation to assess the new angle of the top of the shin bone (the tibial plateau) and check the position of the plate and screws. A sterile dressing will then be placed over the incision. Before waking up from the anaesthesia your pet will also receive a k-laser session to try and reduce any swelling and/or bruising that may occur. 

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic, strong pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them. We are however un able to accept Raw diets for our patients). 

You are welcome to call our Kennel Nurse in the evening (prior to 6pm) to receive an update on how your pet is doing following their surgery and any progress they are making in their recovery.  The following morning the Veterinary Surgeon will do a full examination on your pet to assess how they have coped with the anaesthesia and evaluate how the operated leg is following the surgery. 

If you can give us a ring around 9.30am the morning after, we can then inform you how they’ve been overnight and get a discharge appointment booked.
Discharge instructions shall be provided, and a recheck appointment booked around two weeks after the surgery.  Repeat x-rays will be taken around eight weeks post operatively to ensure everything is healing as it should.

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they have dietary requirements  (We are however un able to accept Raw diets for our patients)
  • Please ensure that we have all of your insurance policy information in order to process a claim when your pet’s treatment is finished. 
  • Your pet will have to be restricted to a small room or a cage post operatively until advised otherwise by your vet. 

Arthroscopy

Preparing for your pet's Arthroscopy

What is arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is when we insert a small camera into your pets joint. This allows the surgeon to examine the joint through a minimally invasive procedure. Arthroscopy can be used as a diagnostic procedure or as part of a treatment plan. 

How is Arthroscopy performed?

Arthroscopy is performed under a general anaesthesia. The hair is clipped over the joint(s) to be investigated and then the skin is aseptically prepared.

Small incisions are made into the joint(s) to create a path for the arthroscopic camera, fluid and surgical instruments. The incisions into the joint only need to be a few millimetres long so as a result, any discomfort following the procedure is reduced so to speed up recovery. 

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them). 

You are welcome to call our Kennel Nurse in the evening (prior to 6pm) for an update on how your pet is doing following their surgery and any progress they are making in their recovery. 


The following morning the Veterinary Surgeon will do a full examination on your pet to assess how they have coped with the anaesthesia and evaluate how the operated leg is following the surgery. 
If you can give us a ring around 9.30am the morning following your pets discharge we can then inform you how they’ve been overnight and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate.       

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (we do not accept raw diets for our patients)
  • Please ensure that we have all of your insurance policy information in order to process a claim when your pet’s treatment is finished.

Fracture Repair

Preparing for your pet's fracture repair

Unfortunately fractures can occur in dogs and cats. There are many types of fractures and treatment depends on type. 

What to expect

Fractures usually occur as a result of trauma such as being hit by a car or falling from height. In some circumstances there may be other life-threatening injuries which need to be managed prior to treating the fracture. On admission your pet will undergo diagnostic imaging such as radiography and ultrasound to detect whether there is any extra injuries other than the fracture itself. We will also take specific radiographs of the fracture so it can assessed fully to enable to the surgeon to decide on a treatment plan, whether this is surgical or a conservative splint.

How is the surgery performed?

Most animals will need to undergo surgical repair of the fracture. We will usually perform a blood sample prior to carrying out an anaesthesia which may highlight any underlying issues we may have missed. Once we are happy that your pet is stable enough for anaesthesia, a catheter will be placed and we will proceed to surgery. 

Whilst in theatre your pet will receive monitoring by a Veterinary Nurse using a full multiparameter monitoring machine, ensuring all your pet’s vitals are monitored closely throughout the duration of the surgery. 

Fractures can be fixed via bone plates and screws, pins or external frames depending on the individual and the fracture being treated. The surgeon will ensure that you are aware of the plan and that you are happy for us to proceed. 

Following the surgery

Most patients following surgery will be comfortable enough to go home the following day. More complex fractures may need to stay in a couple of days for us to monitor the post-operative swelling, and ensure we are able to provide strong enough pain relief following the procedure. In some cases your pet may have a dressing placed to ensure the limb is kept in a suitable position for fracture healing. We will ask you to return regularly for dressing checks and let you know what to monitor for at home in regards to ensure it stays clean and dry. 

There is a variation of when patients will start to walk following their surgery. Some will start walking soon following the surgery and others may take a bit longer. We will discuss this in more detail after your pet’s surgery.        

Once your pet is awake and recovering well from the anaesthetic pain relief will be continued and food will be offered as soon as your pet is ready (if they have any specific allergy requirements, please bring a few meals of their food from home in for them). 

You are welcome to call our Kennel Nurse in the evening (prior to 6pm) to     receive an update on how your pet is doing following their surgery and any progress they are making in their recovery. The following morning the Veterinary Surgeon will do a full examination on your pet to assess how they have coped with the anaesthesia and evaluate how the operated leg is following the surgery.

If you can give us a ring around 9.30am the morning we can then inform you how they’ve been overnight and when a discharge appointment will be appropriate. 

Things to consider before your appointment:

  • Your pet will need to be starved from 8pm the night before. (Water can be available right up until your appointment).
  • Please bring in any current medications your pet is on.
  • Please bring in your pet’s food if they need to stick to their diet. (we do not accept Raw diets)
  • Please ensure that we have all of your insurance policy information in order to process a claim when your pet’s treatment is finished.
  • Your pet will need to be restricted to a small room or a cage post operatively until you are informed otherwise by your vet.      

Practice information

Risca Branch

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  • Mon
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    9:00am - 12:00pm (Alternate Saturdays)
  • Sun
    Closed
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Find us here:

139 Commercial Street Risca Newport Gwent NP11 6EE
get directions with Google Maps

Langstone Branch

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  • Mon
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Tue
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Wed
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Thu
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Fri
    8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Sat
    9:00am - 12:00pm (Alternate Saturdays)
  • Sun
    Closed
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Find us here:

Langstone Business Village Langstone Newport Gwent NP18 2LH
get directions with Google Maps